Category Archives: William E. Thomas

#Arnhem70: William the Soldier

One of the few photos we have of William in uniform, taken in Palestine c.1947.
One of the few photos we have of William in uniform, taken in Palestine c.1947.

I wish I could tell you more about who William the soldier was. Very few details about my grandfather’s time in the army are known by me or the family. Why? Because he very rarely talked about it.

In fact, I don’t recall ever speaking to Gramps in any fine detail about the war until after his retirement. He found it very difficult and there were only certain aspects he was willing or able to talk about. It was only when he began writing that he began to open up about his experiences.

He kept no personal mementos from the war or Palestine. There are only a few pictures, probably captured on a box brownie, and then dating from after the war ended.

So what do we know about William the soldier?

We know that he signed up at the tender age of 17, leaving a job in a factory in Harrow in order to join the fight against fascism. We also know that he took up the offer of joining the newly formed parachute regiment for no other reason than they were offering a few extra bob a week in pay. We know he undertook his training at Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire.

He was only 18 years old when, 70 years ago this week, Private William Edward Thomas, along with thousands of his comrades, was dropped from a plane into a field on the outskirts of the Dutch village of Oosterbeek, and took part in a ferocious battle over the next 10 days to secure the strategically important bridge over the Rhine. It was a battle which was to have a profound effect on the teenager (strange to think he was only half my age now when he was there).

As so many others did, he made some deep and lasting friendships whilst he was in the army. Whilst many undoubtedly never returned from the fighting (or returned to the regiment later, having been captured and taken prisoner) they were all remembered fondly for a long time after.

Once William began to open up, most stories and anecdotes involved those friends. One in particular, Wally Callis, seemed very important to him. Even as the effects of Alzheimer’s Disease took hold, memories of Wally and their escapades would come back, together with the disappointment that they eventually lost touch (Wally emigrated shortly after leaving the army). By all accounts, it seemed that Wally and William – or Bill as most people seemed to call him – were an inseparable pair. Was it their double act that inspired the piano playing duo, “the Twins”, featured in Pegasus Falling? Gramps was an accomplished, if amateur, piano player, and I can just imagine the two of them entertaining their fellow troops in raucous revelry in the mess.

It was in the army that William took up boxing, which he claims to have been very good at. I’d love to know if he was! He had the right build for it, and he maintained an interest in the sport throughout his life, something which surprised me, as he was a dyed-in-the-wool pacifist. But there was something about the art of boxing, the controlled aggression perhaps, which fascinated him.

Photo: Gramps in PalestineThere are so many things about William the soldier that remain unknown, though. His exact role at Arnhem is unclear, although his recalling of events in his fiction shows that he was intimately involved on the front line. I’m not sure when or if he ever progressed to a higher rank than Private. We have no medals or uniform to give us a clue. How did he get back to the UK after fighting in Arnhem? Was he one of the many who were evacuated after the operation failed?

What is clear is that his experiences left a heavy toll on him. He may have gotten through his time in the army physically unharmed, but Arnhem, and indeed Palestine, left him mentally scarred. He had signed up to fight because he felt morally obliged to do so, but he left the army with the unwavering attitude that war is wrong, and must be avoided at all costs.

He did not feel proud of what he did in battle. The very fact that his medals and uniform disappeared, and that he did not open up about his experiences for several decades afterwards, tell you a lot. When ever the subject of the war came up, his very strong opinions would be aired. What happened was necessary, given the circumstances. What he was asked to do had to be done. But it was wrong, very wrong, and the circumstances which lead to him having to undertake such tasks should never have presented themselves in the first place. Not only that, but he did all he could to champion peace and prosperity for the rest of his life.

He may not have been proud of his actions as a soldier, but one thing is clear. He had utmost respect for his fellow soldiers on the front line on both sides of the conflict. And that respect is clear to see in his writing. His characters live and breathe the same conflict he lived through himself. They take orders, they fight, they banter, they suffer, they laugh, they fall in love, just as he did out there. He may pull no punches in his criticism of those in charge, but there is no doubting the empathy with his fellow fighters who had to live with the consequences of the decisions that had been made above their heads.

A lot of the gaps in our knowledge of Gramps’ time out there could possibly be filled by reading his books. Undoubtedly, much of what happens in The Bridge and Pegasus Falling is based on his own experiences, and I am so glad he left us these stories as they give us some clue about what he lived through.

I only realised just how little I know about William the soldier when it was too late to start asking questions. Just as he was willing to start talking, Alzheimer’s began to eat away at his memories and the disease took away my opportunity to ask him more.

But I hope that all is not lost. Once I have published the last part of the Cypress Branches trilogy, I’ll turn my attention to finding out more about Gramps’ time in the army. I’m sure there are records I can look at, and maybe one or two internet forums may come in handy. It would be great to one day write another blog post in the not too distant future filling in some of those gaps.

Pegasus Falling’s new look

It is with great pleasure I present to you all the new cover of Pegasus Falling.

Pegasus Falling's new cover artwork

I’m really pleased with this new look for the first part of the Cypress Branches trilogy. It has taken a long time to get to this point, this being the fifth (and hopefully final!) version of the cover.

The previous four covers were all very similar, with small changes to the original picture of Lesley holding Sammy’s Paratrooper’s cap in her hands. Although I liked the image, and readers kept telling me they liked it too, I was never entirely happy with it as a cover. There was a certain something lacking which I couldn’t put my finger on.

For a while I had had the idea of using the image within a wider context. When I created the cover for The Bridge (William’s short story available to download for free), I considered using the haunting image of falling paratroopers on the cover of Pegasus Falling as well. I had a play around, but didn’t come up with anything satisfactory and left things as they were.

However, a few months ago, I opened up Photoshop again and had another play. This time, inspiration must have struck and I was much happier with the result. The original image of Lesley holding the red beret (captured brilliantly by photographer Dewi Clough) remains, but as part of a much more dynamic whole.

With the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Arnhem coming up next month, I’m really pleased that I have been able to include two bold key images portraying the British Parachute Regiment on the cover. The regiment, then newly formed, played an important part in the infamous and controversial operation which forms the backdrop for the opening scenes of the book. Even more poignantly, the author was a witness to those appalling scenes he describes so vividly – he was 18 when he fought on the front line at Arnhem, and used his experiences to tell his story.

I’d love to know what readers think of the new cover, so please do leave a comment or get in touch.

William Edward Thomas 1925-2014

On 19th February 2014, my grandfather, William E. Thomas, author of the Cypress Branches trilogy, finally lost the greatest battle of his life and passed away. He went peacefully, surrounded by his family. He was 88 years old.

William had been battling the ravages of Alzheimer’s disease for well over a decade. A strong and dignified man, he kept his illness in place for as long as he could and managed to outlive all predictions. Although the family is devastated by his loss, we are also relieved that he is no longer suffering or in pain.

A private funeral for family and friends was held in William’s home town of Milton Keynes on 7th March. His ashes will be interred with his wife in their final resting place – a beautiful green burial ground overlooking the rolling Buckinghamshire countryside – later this month.

William led a full and active life. Soldier, sailor, airman, engineer, technician, scholar, comedian, union man, family man, writer…these are just a few of the roles he played. He has left behind an incredible legacy, which includes his literary work, which is now being enjoyed by an ever growing audience, his engineering successes, and his large and loving family who are all missing him dearly.

The family would like to thank all of William’s readers around the world for the interest and support they have shown in both the man himself and his writing over the last few years. It is gratifying to know that despite William no longer being with us, his voice will continue to be heard through his books for many years to come.

We would like to invite anyone who wishes to, to make a donation in William’s memory to the Alzheimer’s Society, the UK’s leading support and research charity for people with dementia, their families and carers. Their work touches the lives of over 30,000 people every week, providing practical services and support for those affected. You can make a donation by visiting their website here.

William with his wife Sheila, who passed away in March last year,
 at the launch of Pegasus Falling in 2012. 

The Seven Ages of Gramps: Part 7

All the world’s a stage,
And all the men and women merely players:
They have their exits and their entrances;
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages.

Last scene of all,
That ends this strange eventful history,
Is second childishness and mere oblivion,
Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.

Happy birthday, Nan

My nan would have been 85 today. Her passing earlier this year was a devastating blow to the family, and her absence is still felt very strongly.

William & Sheila with their favourite book

Today is also William and Sheila’s 65th wedding anniversary. Theirs was a very emotional and powerful bond. Like all marriages, there were ups and downs, good times and bad. But I like to remember the good times, and there were certainly plenty of those. One thing I fondly remember of my grandparents is the amount of laughter to be had when they were together.

I can’t think of a better way to mark Nan’s birthday, and their anniversary than to share a favourite passage from the book dedicated to her memory. It Never Was You tells the story of two people who, despite all their differences and the struggles they face in post-war Britain, manage to fall head over heals in love and revel in each other’s company. There is plenty of William and Sheila in Harry and Mary.

Nan loved reading William’s writing, and often dipped in and out of the printed books. There was always a smile on her face and a sigh of contentment when she did so. So here’s a passage I think she’d have particularly savoured.

Happy birthday, Nan. Love you xx

Harry departed Rosario for Cordoba punctually, thanks to Juan Peron who, like all good dictators, made the trains run on time. He secured a seat in the observation car at the rear of the train which gave panoramic views of the countryside through large picture windows. The two hundred and fifty mile journey was scheduled to take some six hours so Harry kicked off his shoes and settled himself comfortably to enjoy the scenery. The first leg of the journey, some one hundred and fifty miles west to the small railhead at Villa Maria, would be across the open pampas, the Argentinean sector of that vast treeless plain which lies south of the Mato Grosso and home to some five million steers, those vast herds which drove the country’s economy. From there, the train would travel North West into the easternmost foothills of the Andes. Harry was particularly fond of Cordoba, its quiet provincial atmosphere, its hospitable people but above all the scenery. The city had once been the seat of Spanish colonial government for the region and its architecture and culture was emulate of the city in southern Spain from which it took its name. He gazed contentedly through the window at this ocean of lazily undulating grass. He smiled. What was it Francisco Chavarre had said? ‘My country is only half made up.’ He looked out at the vast emptiness of this half-made land as the pampas rolled interminably past in great sweeping arcs. His eyes moved across the horizon. The summer sun had not yet attained its full power and the grass, still remarkably green from the late spring rains, was flecked with a myriad rash of the bright yellow wild flowers known as ‘pampas roses’. The huge beef herds  were still far to the north but would move slowly southwards as the season advanced to feed on this bounty before the January sun scorched the plain. Then the hills came into view.
     Unlike many of his peers, Harry did not frequent the bars and bordellos of the ports, but preferred to use any free time to explore places of interest and to see as much of the country as he could. He was to learn in time that recounting such experiences was to prove a most effective, if not wholly infallible method of subduing Mary’s runaway chatter. He did not succeed in actually closing her mouth, which hung agape in awe at his stories.
     He told her of trips to Manaus, the great former rubber ‘capital’, a thousand miles along the Amazon, deep in the vast Brazilian rainforest.
     ‘Did you ever see any of them Indians, Hen? You know, them ones with the piss pot ’air cuts and the poison darts?’
     ‘No, darling.’
     ‘Bloody good job though, eh? I mean you wouldn’t want to go play’n 501 up with those nasty buggers, would you?’
     Of taking the train from Mollendo Puña in Chile and then by funicular railway to Lake Titicaca, high among the majestic peaks of the Andes, those vast palaces of nature whose bright blue sunlit summits seemed to mingle with the sky.
     Of the spring carnival in Rio de Janeiro, a three day orgy of the flesh…
     ‘What’s it all in aid of then, Hen?’
     ‘The Rio carnival? It’s a religious festival marking the beginning of lent. The big blowout before the fast. Like Mardi Gras, you know, Shrove Tuesday and all that.’
     ‘Three days on the piss for lent?’
     ‘Look, I’m talking about Rio here, not Bishops Stortford. It’s the time for love.’
     ‘Don’t sound very religious to me, all that sing’n, danc’n and knee trembl’n. Tell you what though, it must beat the shit out of toss’n frigg’n pancakes.’
     Of the Rodeo La Plata, when gauchos, dressed in their finely embroidered boleros, their billowing troos tucked into delicately tooled calf-length leather boots, display their skills at cattle wrangling with the ‘bolo’, a type of lasso carrying a heavily weighted leather ball at its end which winds around the legs of the unfortunate steer, bringing it down…
     ‘Does it hurt them, Hen?’ She turned her head to look up into his face. ‘I mean it’s no joke being pulled arse over tip with a sodd’n lasso, is it?’
     Laughing, he shook his head. ‘Compared with what is to come, that’s the good part.’
     He described, without too much of the gory detail, the scenes in the abattoir. Her face screwed up in horror as she listened. ‘Oh Jesus, that’s awful, those poor things. Can’t they do it any other way? Christ, I don’t think I could face another bit of steak, even if you could get it on the rations.’
     ‘You can always eat fish, sweetheart.’
     ‘Yeah, ’course, they have a much better time, fish. Hooked up by the roof of their mouth or caught in a bloody great net and tipped out to suffocate on the deck of some poxy trawler. What did you have to tell me all that for, anyway? Now I shall probably starve meself to death.’ She snuggled into him. ‘Hen?’
     ‘Yes love?’
     ‘When all sweets come off the rations, will you buy me about a hundredweight of jelly babies?’
     ‘Absolutely! But why jelly babies?’
     ‘Well, people don’t ill-treat jelly babies, do they?’
     ‘Of course they do, they bite their heads off.’
     ‘Oh, you rotten bugger!’


Extract from It Never Was You by William E. Thomas, Chapter Seven
(c) All rights reserved

The Seven Ages of Gramps: Part 6

All the world’s a stage,
And all the men and women merely players:
They have their exits and their entrances;
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. 



The sixth age shifts
Into the lean and slipper’d pantaloon,
With spectacles on nose and pouch on side,
His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide
For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice,
Turning again toward childish treble, pipes
And whistles in his sound. 

The Seven Ages of Gramps: Part 5

All the world’s a stage,
And all the men and women merely players:
They have their exits and their entrances;
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. 


…And then the justice,
In fair round belly with good capon lined,
With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,
Full of wise saws and modern instances;
And so he plays his part. 

<– Part 4

(I began posting this series earlier in the year, and all were scheduled to go out throughout March and April. Unfortunately, events overtook us, and I didn’t think it appropriate to continue at the time. It now feels like time to carry on. You can see all the previous posts in the series by clicking back through the links on each post. To see all the posts in sequence, start here)

It Never Was You blog tour & Giveaway

It Never Was You is available to buy from today! And to celebrate, we’re going on a blog tour. And to celebrate that, we’ve got a fantastic give away lined up. Scroll down to the bottom of this post for the Rafflecopter give away and enter to win a $50 / £30 Amazon voucher, one of three copies of the paperback, or one of ten copies of the ebook.

Here’s the schedule as it stands right now. Bloggers are still signing up for the later dates in the tour, so events will be added over the coming days and weeks. Make sure to check back regularly to make sure you don’t miss anything…

***
Want to get stuck in to the trilogy?
You can get Pegasus Falling, the acclaimed first instalment, on your Kindle, Kobo or Nook for as little as 99c / 79p until the end of June! Grab your copy now before the price reverts to the RRP ($2.99 / £1.99)
***

Thursday 25th April
susanrussoanderson.com

Interview

Our first stop is at the wonderful blog of Susan Russo Anderson, author of the Serafina Florio series. She interviewed Mike about Pegasus Falling, and she was interested in the use of the haunting Adagietto from Mahler’s 5th Symphony. Take a look…

Friday 26th April
susanrussoanderson.com

Excerpt from Pegasus Falling

As a weekend treat, we return to Susan’s blog for an excerpt from Pegasus Falling, the scene which features Mahler’s 5th Symphony. The year is 1946 and the place is Tel Aviv, Palestine. Sammy and Lesley have just met up for the first time since their troubling liaison just after the war, and Mahler’s stirring music is about to have a profound effect on them both. Jump in…

Monday 29th April
outofthebags.com

Review 

Liss is one of the most recent bloggers to read Pegasus Falling, but she has the honour of being the first blogger in the tour to tell us what she made of It Never Was You. She loved it, giving it 4 stars. “Mr. Thomas has weaved a tale of mystery, romance, fact and fiction into a grand masterpiece.” Read on…

Thursday 2nd May
plasticrosaries.com

Review & Excerpt from It Never Was You

“Very different to Pegasus Falling but Thomas’ characters are just as, if not more endearing as ever.”

Today, we head over to Beth Townsend’s brilliant blog for our first UK review, which is exciting, especially as she gave it 4 stars!

Also, Beth chose one of her favourite passages from the book to highlight. Part One is presented here…

Friday 3rd May
plasticrosaries.com

Part Two of the It Never Was You excerpt

We return to Beth’s blog for part two of the excerpt that Beth chose. Beth lives in Liverpool, the setting for the book, and she was struck by the character of Mary and her “Scouse vernacular”, which is shown off to great effect in this funny and clever scene…

Monday 6th May
A Bookish Affair

Guest post

Meg at A Bookish Affair is our host today as we delve into one of the most important themes of the book and ask the question, did William write a romance or a love story? Check out the post here…

Friday 10th May
jillysheep.wordpress.com

Review

Jill is one of the most prolific readers I have ever had the pleasure to meet. She is one of amazon.co.uk’s Hall of Fame reviewers and was also one of the first reviewers who kindly took a chance on an unknown author. Thankfully she loved Pegasus Falling and was delighted to receive her copy of It Never Was You. Today, Jill posted her wonderful review, which you can read here…

Saturday 11th May
jillysheep.wordpress.com

Guest Post

We head back to Jill’s blog to take a closer look at one of the main characters from the trilogy – Harry Williamson…

Monday 13th May
onevintageheart.com

Interview

Juliette Hill is an author (find her short stories on Amazon) who has shown an incredible amount of support for William’s books. Back in September 2012, she hosted an interview with me as well as a glowing review of Pegasus Falling, which was part of the Best Indie Book Festival. Today, she hosts a follow up interview before sharing her thoughts on It Never Was You…

Saturday 18th May
Darlene’s Book Nook

Guest Post

Darlene’s fab blog is our home for the day as list 10 things you didn’t know about William…

Thursday 23rd May

I Read A Book Once

The Eclectic Bookworm

Review

Jonathan Wilhoit runs one of my favourite book review blogs on the web – reviewing a wide range of interesting reads together with his small band of fellow bloggers. Amanda Amaya from Texas read Pegasus Falling earlier this year and was virtually biting my hand off to be one of the first to read It Never Was You. She was, and here are her thoughts.

Sunday 26th May
Missuswolf’s Storyland

Interview

Today, we slip off our shoes, slump into our favourite comfy chair and relax for a cuppa and a catch up with British indie author Gemma Wilford.

Thursday 6th June
World Literary CafeInterview

Author Stacy Eaton took time out of her (extremely) busy schedule to interview me about William, his books and the devastating effect Alzheimer’s has had on him and the family. Officially, this isn’t part of the tour, but I’m chuffed to bits with how the interview came out, so I’m including it here anyway!

Thursday 6th June
The Pax Integral

Guest Post

Something a little different today. We head over to the blog of Meryl S. Fortney, the author of end-of-the-world zombie thriller Pax Corpus. Meryl blogs not only about her books, but also her experiences as a transexual. She hosts a guest post exploring the attitudes to homosexuality in the 1940s and 1950s, and asks, did my grandfather write a homophobic novel?

Friday 7th June
Great Romance Promotions
Excerpt

We delve back into the book today and enjoy a glimpse at what I’m sure will be a romance that touches many a reader’s heart.

Friday 14th June
Lucybirdbooks.com

Guest Post

It’s the last stop on the tour today (I know, sad), but we’ve got a great treat lined up to send the tour off in style.

The Giveaway

Use the Rafflecopter widget below to enter the giveaway. As well as the star prize of a $50 or £30 gift certificate to spend at amazon, we’ve also got five copies of the paperback and 10 copies of the ebook to give away!

All you need to do to enter is “like” the Cypress Branches Trilogy on Facebook and follow @cypressbranches on twitter.

Want more chances to win? Follow our lovely bloggers on Twitter, leave a comment on this post, tweet about the giveaway or leave a comment on the FB page to earn extra entries!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

For Sheila, with love

Tomorrow, It Never Was You, part two of William E. Thomas’s Cypress Branches trilogy, will be officially released as an ebook. It is a day I have been looking forward to for a long time, and the weeks and months that follow will be exciting. But in one way, it will be a sad occasion.

Sheila and William on holiday in Somerset. April 2006

Without a doubt, William’s wife Sheila, my nan, has been the single most important figure in the creation of this trilogy. Not only did she spur on and support William during the years it took him to write the book, she also provided me with unconditional support and encouragement from the moment I first mooted the idea of self-publishing it in 2008.

She was there when William finished the book. She was there when I handed him his copy of the hardback. She was there when Pegasus Falling, the first paperback was revealed and she was there when the first reviews started coming in. She insisted that I hurry up and finish the trilogy so that she could see them all together, and the project completed.

Sadly, her wish wasn’t to come true. In April last year, Sheila suffered a devastating stroke. After a year long battle to recover, she passed away on 7th March.

The last few months have been a difficult time for the Thomas family. We lost our matriarch, a woman who never failed to express her love, and knew how to do so in so many different ways. She was a formidable woman, an inspiration to many, and never failed to make an impression on everyone who met her. Her circle of friends continued to grow even in her last days.

She was married to William for 65 years. A marriage that long is bound to have both its highs and lows, and there were plenty of both for the two of them, but their love for one another was constant, and truly inspiring. They raised a family of six children who went on to provide them with countless grandchildren and great grandchildren who have developed into a close-knit, supporting and loving family.

Sheila was buried in a Humanist ceremony that was attended by her large family and extended group of friends and ex-colleagues last month. She has been laid to rest in a meadow at a green burial ground. It is a beautiful spot with a wide view of the Buckinghamshire countryside that she would have loved.

She leaves a huge hole in our lives and will be sorely missed by all who knew her, but she would hate for us to put our lives on hold to grieve, and so plans for the publication of William’s second book have carried on and the launch is going ahead as planned.

It Never Was You is dedicated to Sheila’s memory.

Sheila Thomas
29th November 1928 – 7th March 2013

ARCs of It Never Was You available now

UPDATE 24th APRIL 2013
ARCs of It Never Was You are no longer available, as the ebook has now launched. 
If you are a reviewer or blogger interested in receiving a copy of William’s books in exchange for an honest and fair review, then please contact me by sending an email to contactus AT acuteanglebooks.co.uk. 


CALLING ALL READERS OF LITERARY FICTION!

It Never Was You will be released in paperback and ebook at the end of April.

In the run up to the launch, I am releasing 50 Electronic Advance Reader Copies (ARCs) of It Never Was You to readers in exchange for an honest and fair review.

Fill in the form below to request your copy now!

I will send an ebook (in the correct format for your reading device) to any reader who agrees to post an honest and fair review on Amazon.com or Amazon.co.uk (wherever you are based) within 4 weeks of the book’s publication date (24th April 2013). Reviews do not have to be positive – just honest – but please read the description below before requesting your copy.

You will gain extra brownie points if you also post your review on your blog, Goodreads, B&N, Waterstones, etc.

Will you enjoy It Never Was You

If you enjoy reading emotional stories with war as the background – but not necessarily “war fiction” (think Pat Barker, Sebastian Faulks, Ian McEwan, Louis de Bernières) you’ll love William’s books.

Part love story, part social history, The Cypress Branches trilogy weaves together the stories of an incredible set of characters whose lives and loves are buffeted by the ever changing attitudes and politics of the post-war era. They are ordinary people caught up in extraordinary times and it makes for exhilarating reading. 

In part 1 of the trilogy, Pegasus Falling, we followed the story of Sammy Parker, a World War II paratrooper who, after attacking a German officer, finds himself incarcerated in a concentration camp. There he discovers not only the horrors of the Nazi’s final solution, but also Naomi, a woman who Sammy comes to depend on to survive. When the camp is liberated, the couple are separated and Sammy battles to find out what happened to the woman he loves.

Part two, titled It Never Was You, follows the heartbreaking story of a quiet, middle class merchant seaman and his unexpected, tragic relationship with a beautiful and exuberant waitress from the Liverpool docks as they struggle to reconcile their feelings for each other with the class boundaries and ever changing attitudes of post-war Britain. It continues the saga started in Pegasus Falling and packs a lot of emotion, drama and history into its pages.

The book is written using UK English conventions and features British regional dialects. 

If you’d like to take part, but haven’t read Pegasus Falling (Part One of the trilogy) yet, don’t worry. It Never Was You can be read and enjoyed without reading Pegasus Falling first. 
However, if you’d prefer to read the trilogy in order, I’d be happy to supply you with an electronic copy of both books, on the proviso that you to post a review of both books on Amazon. As this will double the amount of reading you are committing to, I’ll be happy to wait a little longer for your review of It Never Was You (but not too long, mind – I’ll be dying to find out what you think!)

Ready to receive your ARC?

If you think you’d enjoy It Never Was You, and can commit to reading it before the end of April, please fill in the form below. We’ll email your ARC to you as soon as possible.